Coaching Modalities

Mental Fitness in a Nutshell

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The basic idea is that you need three elements for Mental Fitness:
(1) The ability to intercept your saboteurs
(2) Activation of your sage, and
(3) Stronger self-command

Intercepting your saboteurs

The nine saboteurs are avoider, controller, pleaser, hyperachiever, hypervigilant, hyperrational, restless, stickler, and victim. Our dominant saboteurs act like a program that is implemented by your judge. These fear-based responses, often learned in childhood, provide a sense of safety and control. They provide a distinct motivation that influences the way you think, feel, and behave. Each one limits our functionality in specific ways.

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Mastering the Five Sage Powers for Mental Fitness

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Shirzad Chamine introduces the concept of sage and its five powers in his book “Positive Intelligence: Why Only 20% of Teams and Individuals Achieve Their True Potential and How You Can Achieve Yours.”

The overarching sage viewpoint is that every outcome or circumstance can be turned into a gift or opportunity. This involves looking at how every experience can help you grow and be a source of inspiration.

The sage outlook is about how every experience that you have has a miracle embedded in it. This allows you to work with and through any pain and transmute it to positive outcomes. There are five sage powers or perspectives that can become your focus. They are Empathize, Explore, Innovate, Navigate, and Activate.

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Tapping for Love in your Core Being

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We all yearn for unconditional love. Can we fulfl this by beingbeing the change we wish to see?

Tapping is a great way to simultaneously address the emotional mental and energetic aspects that are holding you back.

I made these Tapping for Love videos so that we can begin to experience deep unconditional love for ourselves. In doing so we also mirror that in our increased appreciation and compassion for others.

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The Cracked Pot

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This story is about how something can be a blessing even if it doesn’t serve an originally designed purpose.

A water bearer in India had two large pots. They were hung on each end of a pole which he carried across his neck. One of the pots had a crack in it, while the other pot was perfect. The perfect pot always delivered a full portion of water at the end of the long walk from the stream to the house. Whereas, the cracked pot arrived only half full.

For a full two years, this went on daily, with the bearer delivering only one and a half pots full of water to the house. Of course, the perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments, perfect to the end for which it was made. However, the poor cracked pot was ashamed of its own imperfection. It was miserable that it was able to accomplish only half of what it had been made to do. After two years of what it perceived to be a bitter failure, it spoke to the water bearer one day by the stream.

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Blind Men and the Elephant

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Are we all metaphorically blind? Our perspective is like a view from the place we stand and frequently influences what we think, say, feel, and perceive. As well as how we act.

One counterpoint to this is attempting to place ourselves in another person’s position. The filters we have in place can also be shifted by paying attention to the things we like about something that we reflexively dislike.

If you take your own personal experience and listen deeply to the experience of another you can gain a much fuller, richer, more complete picture. Imagine how this poem would go if what is being shared is viewed as a contribution for collaboration rather than an assertion for competition. What if time and energy were invested in not jumping to snapshot conclusions?

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